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DC Police Identify 5th Possible Victim of Alleged ‘Caddy Killer’

DC police have identified a woman who was found dead in a shopping cart in the Northeast, and a man police believe to be a serial killer is someone with an interest in her death.

DC police have confirmed the identity of a woman who was found dead in a shopping cart in the Northeast, and a man police believe to be a serial killer is someone with an interest in her death.

A DC police spokesperson confirmed to OMCP that Anthony Eugene Robinson – who authorities say is responsible for at least four other murders – is the person involved in the murder of 40-year-old Sonya Champ , of Northwest.

Authorities found Champ unresponsive and unconscious in the 200 block of F Street last September. His death has since been ruled a homicide; initially it was classified as “undetermined”.



First reported on WTOP, the woman’s body was found a few blocks from Union Station, in a shopping cart covered with a blanket. Police had been investigating whether she was Robinson’s fifth victim.

Anyone with information about what happened should call DC police at 202-727-9099.

Robinson is suspected of killing at least four people whose remains were found in Fairfax County and Harrisonburg, Virginia.

Fairfax County police have identified two victims – Stephanie Harrison, 48, of Redding, Calif., and Cheyenne Brown, 29, of southeast DC. Their remains were found in a plastic container near a shopping cart in a wooded area near the 2400 block of Fairhaven Avenue. .

The other two victims were Tonita Lorice Smith, who was found dead in Harrisonburg, and Allene Elizabeth “Beth” Redmon, also of Harrisonburg.

Robinson is currently being held in Harrisonburg and has been charged with two counts of first degree murder. He has not been charged in the deaths of Brown or Harrison, but Fairfax County Police Chief Kevin Davis said in January he expects he eventually will be.

Police said Robinson used dating apps to lure women and meet them at motels before killing them and transporting their remains in shopping carts.

WTOP’s Neal Augenstein contributed to this report.